forum Ask me about Depression, OCD, Autism, or ADHD
Started by @Fangirl616 group
tune

people_alt 55 followers

@Fangirl616 group

Ok, so one of the key things that you've most likely heard about is movement. It can range from tapping fingers or bouncing the leg to having the urge to start running around.

A less talked about aspect is memory. For example, a person with ADHD may remember a line of a book they read n kindergarten, but not what they ate for breakfast.

Fidgets were invented for people with ADHD. Its not uncommon for someone with ADD to be using one, even if its not considered 'trendy'. Things like fidget spinners, gum, a chewable necklace, and stress balls are things someone with this disorder may use regularly.

This is pretty much all I can think of. If you have a more specific question, I can probably do a better job of answering.

@Fangirl616 group

"People sometimes use the term ADHD interchangeably with attention deficit disorder (ADD), to refer to ADHD without hyperactivity. However, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) only recognizes only ADHD. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) does not provide criteria for ADD."

ADD is not a medical condition, and if you say it, people will assume you mean ADHD.

@Moxie group

I may be wrong here but I've done a lot of research on this and I'm fairly sure that ADD is a type of ADHD. Just like Jynnie said, they're very similar but ADD "doesn't involve constant movement and fidgeting". It's kind of like a type of ADHD.

@GoodThingGoing group

Yeah, similar but not the exact same. For example, I'm not physically hyperactive but I do have an insanely busy brain. I did some sort of testing a few years back and it involved some sort of waves that were supposed to calm your brain or something and I had the highest score they'd ever seen.

@norgur

"People sometimes use the term ADHD interchangeably with attention deficit disorder (ADD), to refer to ADHD without hyperactivity. However, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) only recognizes only ADHD. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) does not provide criteria for ADD."

ADD is not a medical condition, and if you say it, people will assume you mean ADHD.

It is, just not in DSM-5. Most countries do recognize ADD as disorder. As both are closely related, many just use the term "AD(H)D" or the like to cover both. The US-version of the ICD10 does split the two. ADD is F90.0, while ADHD is F90.1.
And while many symptoms are the same, hyperactivity is a stark deficit compared to the dreamy nature of ADD-patients.

@norgur

What are things ADHD people have that ADD people don't?

ADHD presents with an impulsive nervousness/urge to move, often along with an ICD (impulse control disorder), ADD is everything but that. ADD patients are as distractable as ADHD patients though. But as they do not feel any hyperactivity, they often seem quite the opposite to ADHD patients: Calm, a little dreamy, often daydreaming. That sort of thing. Some studies suggest that this is the more common type for girls actually, but that may be outdated.

@Fangirl616 group

Could you talk a little about OCD, if that's alright?

OCD. Well, its complicated. For starters, its made me want to commit suicide via intrusive thoughts.

But lets break this down. OCD is Obsessions and Compulsions. An obsession is an intrusive thought that gets stuck and won't go away. These thoughts trigger fear. And so, you are compelled to do a specific thing to get rid of the fear.

This is a basic summary, but if you'd like more information, just ask!

@Althalosian-is-the-father book

What are things ADHD people have that ADD people don't?

ADHD presents with an impulsive nervousness/urge to move, often along with an ICD (impulse control disorder), ADD is everything but that. ADD patients are as distractable as ADHD patients though. But as they do not feel any hyperactivity, they often seem quite the opposite to ADHD patients: Calm, a little dreamy, often daydreaming. That sort of thing. Some studies suggest that this is the more common type for girls actually, but that may be outdated.

Asking for me a friend, what if it alternates from spacey periods (far more common) to jumping up and shouting (sometimes), or simply wanting to walk around a room (whenever not op 1 or 2).

@norgur

What are things ADHD people have that ADD people don't?

ADHD presents with an impulsive nervousness/urge to move, often along with an ICD (impulse control disorder), ADD is everything but that. ADD patients are as distractable as ADHD patients though. But as they do not feel any hyperactivity, they often seem quite the opposite to ADHD patients: Calm, a little dreamy, often daydreaming. That sort of thing. Some studies suggest that this is the more common type for girls actually, but that may be outdated.

Asking for me a friend, what if it alternates from spacey periods (far more common) to jumping up and shouting (sometimes), or simply wanting to walk around a room (whenever not op 1 or 2).

That would be the a textbook example of the H part :) You Your friend might have the ADHD-variant, if tested positively.

@Fangirl616 group

OCD again..
How does it develop? How did you realise you had it?

Well, at first its not really noticeable. See, OCD disguises itself as logic but it takes it to the point that its no longer logical. In the beginning, its easily missed. But every time you give into it, it grows stronger.

An example: I'm worried about my friend dying in a car crash bc they drive recklessly. This is the logic point. OCD can do one of two things with this.

A. If I don't do this very specific thing (maybe tapping on a doorway exactly 9 times), they will die in a car crash and it will be my fault.

B. I must stop my friend from driving at all costs.

Now, it won't start like this. It could start like:

A. Knocking on wood is lucky! Maybe if I knock of this nearby wooden thing (that happens to be a doorway, they'll stay safe.

B. Maybe I can offer to drive today, in case something unexpected happens on the road.

This is taken to the extreme. Another example may be:

What if somebody poisoned my food?

This is a 'What If' question. These are prompted by OCD.

Except, when a person with this disorder receives this question, they can't laugh it off and say its dumb. They get stuck on it.

I'll always make my own food!
Or
I'll prompt my friends into eating a bite of my dish first.

Something like that. Until it reaches the point where they can't eat at all, too afraid of being poisoned.

Here's something that happens with introverted people. They become less and less inclined to go out. And this is normal, but OCD makes it so they never want to go out. Eventually, they can't leave their house without extreme terror and panic.

For me, personally, I took a test at a specific doctors office who specializes in mental health. This is when I got my diagnosis.